kerkevik_2014 (kerkevik_2014) wrote,
kerkevik_2014
kerkevik_2014

Important info to remember from A Mighty Girl

For many, menstruation is still a taboo subject and, as such, very few TV programs or films, even those about tween and teen girls, ever discuss periods. One of the best TV moments depicting a family lovingly responding to a girl's first period comes from a 1989 episode of the long-running series Roseanne. In it, sports-loving Darlene has her first period and starts throwing away all of her athletic equipment, thinking that her sports days are over until her mom intervenes:

Roseanne: Oh, I get it! You think you have to leave this stuff behind you now. Like women have to give up baseball gloves and start wearing aprons and stuff.

Darlene: All I know is I’m not going to start shaving my legs or wearing pantyhose like Becky!

Roseanne: You think I make Becky put on makeup and wear perfume? No, she does it because she’s always liked that kind of stuff. That’s the kind of woman she wants to be.

Darlene: Well, that’s not the kind of woman I want to be!

Roseanne: Well then what are you throwing all your stuff away for then? These are a girl’s things, Darlene, as long as a girl uses them.

To watch a 10-minute clip from the episode on YouTube, visithttp://tinyurl.com/kgzktfm

For many girls, what little they hear about menstruation is frequently negative or incorrect, and even school health classes that discuss the subject often focus on the “nuts and bolts” without ever touching on the real, practical experience of a monthly cycle. But parents, mentors, and friends of Mighty Girls can turn this milestone of womanhood into a much more positive experience.

In our blog post, "Teaching Your Mighty Girl About Her Menstrual Cycle," we recommend a number of excellent books to help girls understand how menstruation works as well as how to manage the physical and emotional changes that come with it.

These recommendations include books geared toward helping prepare girls who are still a year or two away from menarche as well ones that offer teens a more detailed understanding of how their cycles and bodies work. The post also highlights several period supply kits that are helpful to have on hand so your Mighty Girl will feel prepared for when the time comes.

To read our post on "Teaching Your Mighty Girl About Her Menstrual Cycle," visit http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=3281

For more great resources to help tween and teen girls understand the physical and emotional changes during puberty, visit our post "Talking with Tweens and Teens about their Bodies" athttp://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=2229

And, for those with younger Mighty Girls in preschool and early elementary school, we recommend resources on how to teach them about their bodies in our post at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=2006

For many, menstruation is still a taboo subject and, as such, very few TV programs or films, even those about tween and teen girls, ever discuss periods. One of the best TV moments depicting a family lovingly responding to a girl's first period comes from a 1989 episode of the long-running series Roseanne. In it, sports-loving Darlene has her first period and starts throwing away all of her athletic equipment, thinking that her sports days are over until her mom intervenes:Roseanne: Oh, I get it! You think you have to leave this stuff behind you now. Like women have to give up baseball gloves and start wearing aprons and stuff.Darlene: All I know is I’m not going to start shaving my legs or wearing pantyhose like Becky!Roseanne: You think I make Becky put on makeup and wear perfume? No, she does it because she’s always liked that kind of stuff. That’s the kind of woman she wants to be.Darlene: Well, that’s not the kind of woman I want to be!Roseanne: Well then what are you throwing all your stuff away for then? These are a girl’s things, Darlene, as long as a girl uses them.To watch a 10-minute clip from the episode on YouTube, visit http://tinyurl.com/kgzktfmFor many girls, what little they hear about menstruation is frequently negative or incorrect, and even school health classes that discuss the subject often focus on the “nuts and bolts” without ever touching on the real, practical experience of a monthly cycle. But parents, mentors, and friends of Mighty Girls can turn this milestone of womanhood into a much more positive experience.In our blog post, "Teaching Your Mighty Girl About Her Menstrual Cycle," we recommend a number of excellent books to help girls understand how menstruation works as well as how to manage the physical and emotional changes that come with it.These recommendations include books geared toward helping prepare girls who are still a year or two away from menarche as well ones that offer teens a more detailed understanding of how their cycles and bodies work. The post also highlights several period supply kits that are helpful to have on hand so your Mighty Girl will feel prepared for when the time comes.To read our post on "Teaching Your Mighty Girl About Her Menstrual Cycle," visit http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=3281For more great resources to help tween and teen girls understand the physical and emotional changes during puberty, visit our post "Talking with Tweens and Teens about their Bodies" at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=2229And, for those with younger Mighty Girls in preschool and early elementary school, we recommend resources on how to teach them about their bodies in our post at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=2006


Goddess watch over us all,
'tis ok to be Takei,
Ray.
Tags: a mighty girl, feminism
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